A Friday the 13th Opportunity

or Through the “Looking” (Google) Glass

If you’ve been considering a new look for your website or are ready to build another site, let my weird week pay off for you big time.

What a strange week this has been. End of term drama with students, getting extra “Daddy days” while my wife nurses her mother back to post-surgical health, and fighting off some sort of cough-snot nastiness.

google-glass_techcrunchA couple more things that happened this week that are relevant to you: a client abandoned a project in the customization phase and Google invited me to play with their latest toy. These two together lead to an interesting opportunity for you.

I’m quite happy with the latest custom theme I built (that looks amazingly like the one you’re viewing now!). Intentionally pared down visual elements, easily customizable, and responsive/mobile friendly. Unfortunately, the client is no longer planning to use the theme due to a shift in their business internals.

I suspect this will develop into my latest boilerplate for future custom themes. And in the meantime, I’d rather get it out there on some more sites rather than languish on my hardrive.

Combine that with a time-sensitive invite to get my own Google Glass unit, and I start feeling like the Godfather (as well as sounding like Corleone with this sore throat!) — I’d like to make you an offer you can’t refuse.

This project was over $1000 and we cut the customization phase short. I’d like to pick up there and customize this WordPress theme for a few individuals and cover the costs of the Glass unit without disturbing the rest of my budget.

When you take advantage of my shiny object syndrome (or rather the commercialization of technology I’ve been drooling over and attempting to piece together over the last two decades!), you get the leverage of the core theme I just built ($1,000+) as well as an initial round of customizations ($500) for just the cost of the customizations — $500.

I will also include a .com domain name and cpanel hosting for a year ($100) and install and configure WordPress on your new site ($50). And if you have your content ready now, I will create up to the first 5 pages of the site ($250). (Including a “contact us” page with form that emails you and also allows you to browse all the entries within the WordPress dashboard.)

If you’re updating an existing site, I will install and test the new theme on a representative subset of your site to ensure that there are no conflicts with any existing plugins on your site that may not play nice with others ($300-500).

And, once you’ve paid, I have a wide library of plugins that I can install from other vendors that I have with “developer rights,” meaning I can install them on client sites as well as my own. These include plugins to run your own affiliate program, membership site, or appointment system (among many other things) — all within your existing WordPress site.

Now, I can only honor this for a very small number of people over the next two days (through 9pm Pacific on Sunday) because I have a limited time to order my Google Glass (my invite is only good for 7 days!) and I also have very little time for additional client work between now and the end of the year. If you order and my schedule is already full, I will have to refund your money and I can quote your project after the new year.

Secure Payment Options:


with Dwolla or

with Paypal

For this, I don’t have time (or interest) to put together a fancy direct-response salesletter or a bunch of compelling graphics. If this is something you want/need/find interesting, reserve your place now and you’ll have a new site or new look by the end of the year.

Either way, have a happy Christmas and create a wonderful new year!

P.S. What do *you* think of Google Glass? Freakshow, fad, or phenom?! Comment below.

Google heatmap

While talking with one of my web design clients, the question of where to put certain design elements came up.

I made this numbered image so that we could talk about regions of the Google heatmap image while working on his new site. The cool feature of this heat map is that it is based on the big G’s extensive Adsense data to recommend placement of ads for the most clicks (darker is higher click density).

Google heat map Adsense

Are you keeping these sorts of test results in mind as a starting point for your own tests on new sites?

Update (May 10, 2011): through “random” connections this evening I just ran across Michael Campbell’s Ultimate Heatmap report which overlays the major advertisers’ heat- and clickmaps to produce his “ultimate” map. The report also includes the main ad sizes to consider and 9 heavily tested templates for advertising on blogs. He makes the same suggestion of using his results as a starting point to run your own tests.

Enjoy!